An Arctic Adventure 2017

The Arctic Circle, Ice Hotel 27 and Husky Dogs

The Original Ice Hotel Year 27

If you want to see the Northern lights Sweden is an excellent area to go to see this interesting phenomenon and the Ice hotel in Jukkarjarta makes for a doubly wonderful experience.

The Northern lights or ‘Aurora borealis’ is a natural phenomenon which occurs when there are collisions between electrically charged particles from the sun that enter the earth’s atmosphere. The lights are seen above the magnetic poles of the northern and southern hemispheres, these are called the ‘Aurora borealis’ in the north and the ‘Aurora Australis’ in the South.

Aurora displays appear in many colours with green and pink being the most common however shades of red, yellow, blue and violet have also been reported and are seen in various formations from patches of light to streamers, arcs, rippling curtains or shooting rays across the night sky.

According to researchers, the lights of the Aurora generally extend from 50 miles to as high as 400 miles above the earth’s surface, an astounding distance.

For many years I have been intrigued and drawn to The Original Ice Hotel in Sweden just off the Arctic Circle and this year (2017), is its 27th Anniversary, so it is referred to as Ice Hotel 27.

The original Ice Hotel is totally unique as it is reformed every year, designed by a team of artists, architects and snow builders Worldwide, it comes from the Torne River and is built with approximately 1,000 tonnes of Ice and 30,000 m3 of ‘snice’ a mixture of ice and snow.

The structure is put up then each ice room is hand crafted uniquely, there are great long hallways with chandeliers, made of ice of course, an ice chapel where you can legally get married and an ice bar with ice glasses for drinks.

In the springtime, it is left to naturally melt away back into the Torne river from where it came.

An Ice Room

Creative Ice Room

My dream has long been to experience staying in an ice room at the ice hotel so I put a tailored trip together and decided that it would also be interesting to visit another part of Arctic Sweden and experience the Tree Hotel where they have some extraordinary treehouses, the most interesting three being the UFO, the Birds Nest and The Mirrorcube.

Set up on a hill in the forests of Lulea are these fabulous little retreats, the UFO was the one that appealed to me so I put together a customised 5 day trip via Arctic Direct to visit both places and travel across country by train from Lulea to Jukkasjarvi.

I flew from London Heathrow Airport to Lulea via Stockholm, there were no direct flights, however this journey was effortless to make and the airports were easy to navigate around.

Banwell Bone Caves

Banwell Bone Caves

Imagine entering a tiny opening on a hillside into a slippery, rocky cavern to explore pitch black chambers by candlelight, the lowest one revealing a turquoise blue lake and much later a further discovery of a cave filled with thousands of animal bones, the like you have never seen before.

In 1842, a human skeleton was found on the grounds of the estate close to the caves and remains an unsolved mystery to this day.

Banwell Bone Cave

Banwell Bone Cave

In the 19th century the reopening of this lost cave, followed by the second cave stacked with bones of animals no longer living in Britain found on Banwell Hill, caused a great deal of interest.

At the time, the land was owned by the Bishop of Bath and Wells, named George Henry Law who believed that the bones had been washed in by Noah’s flood.

He invited people to come and see the caves to witness the aftermath of Gods punishment of a wicked world as a warning of their own fate if they did not live their lives within the ideals of the church.

Nowadays, we know that the bones are from animals who lived in the ice age and the little known site in Banwell village has been classed as a Site of Special Scientific Interest and important to the scientific study of Ice Age Britain.

According to John Chapman, who made a short film about the caves, any bones found of the ‘same period of the Ice Age as these bones are known as ‘Banwell Type Fauna’ and the caves are one of the best areas in Britain for the protected species of Greater Horseshoe Bats.

The bones are now known to be from the Pleistocene period, 50,000 – 80,000 years old, it would have been arctic landscape in that time and the animals had been living above the caves on the land and their bones would have washed into the cave by melting ice and high rivers.

The Natural History Museum has identified the bones as:
Bison (Bison priscus)
Otter (Lutra sp.)
Wolf (Canis lupus)
Wolverine (Gulo gulo)
Arctic Hare (Lepus timidus)
Reindeer (Rangifer taradus)
Northern Vole (Microtus oeconomous)
Brown Bear (Ursus arctos)
Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes)
Arctic Fox (Vulpes lagopus)

Whalebone cave entrance

Whalebone cave entrance

At the time of the discovery the public were fascinated by the site fueled by the Bishops wild religious beliefs and people flocked to see the caves, the Bishop planted woods on the hill and built follies, summer houses and a tower.

Then in 1834 he built a small Druids temple to show visitors how ‘the wicked Pagans were punished for their way of life.’

According to local men John Chapman and John Haynes the caves were popular for about 40 years but then people lost interest and the caves were forgotten for a long time.

Egypt – Cairo, Luxor and Aswan

Egypt

Egypt

Egypt

28 years ago (1988) as I ate some scrambled eggs on toast at my parents’ house, my Mother suggested going away for a trip to ‘see some wonderful things’ and would I like to go with her?

Yes I would.

She originally wanted to go to Israel, however when I ran down to the Travel Agents, they told me it was too hostile at that time and to choose somewhere else. I went for Egypt as I had always been drawn to the mystique and charm of this wonderful country with its rich, diverse history with beautiful strange constructions, artefacts and hieroglyphic carvings.

This trip is really where all of my travels began and where I got ‘the bug’ for globetrotting.

So Egypt it was, following a short flight of just under 5 hours we arrived in Cairo and for the very first time I stepped out into hot, heavy night air, something that to this day never fails to surprise me when it hits and something that I always enjoy.
There was a small group of us; the others were John and Ema, Jo, Barbara, Peter, Terry (Mummery) quite an apt surname considering we were in Egypt I thought and lastly an American writer called Monica.

CAIRO – The capital city of Egypt and the largest, this place was a bustling metropolis of people, animals, cars and mopeds, crossing roads here was not easy as motorists seemed to have no sense of the pedestrian. The company (Hayes and Jarvis) had over booked us all so our small group was upgraded to the Sheraton Hotel in Cairo, overlooking the Nile.

One of the most prominent memories I have of Egypt is the very loud singing over a microphone by a Holy man reciting prayers at about 5am in the morning and then again at about 7pm in the evening, it sticks in my mind to this day.

Our guide for the whole trip was called Farid, he was a huge plump man who really knew his stuff on Egyptology and encouraged us to see as much as possible, our driver was a funny little man who was also very likeable, he taught me some Egyptian swear words including “Imshi” which I would shout out daily to all who passed us by, not realising until it was too late that I was in fact telling them to ***k off!!!
Step pyramid

Step Pyramid

Step Pyramid

Giza has three Pyramids, the largest is known as ‘The Great Pyramid’ was constructed around 2560 BCE and is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the World, then there is ‘The Pyramid of Cheops’ built as a Tomb for the Pharaoh Cheops.
This Pyramid has three chambers inside starting with the lowest chamber which was cut into bedrock and was unfinished, then there is the Queens Chamber on the mid layer and the Kings Chamber is at the top of the pyramid structure. The Great Pyramid of Giza is the only pyramid in Egypt known to contain both ascending and descending passages.

Venice

Venice is an intriguing and awe inspiring city, set in a large lagoon it is made up of canals bridged by some impressive and elegant architecture, Venice has been given a few names including City of Canals, City of Bridges, City of Masks and the Floating City amongst other names, all of which fit perfectly, my favourite name for it though is Queen of the Adriatic, a suitably romantic name for this beautiful place.

A most beautiful city

A most beautiful city

Beautiful it may be, filled with reflections and Expressionistic shadows everywhere you look, nicely scented it is not. The canals can be quite pungent at certain times of the year, the high summer can be particularly bad at times and is best avoided in my opinion, as well as it being crazily busy with tourists then too.

I went to Venice for a short break as I was drawn to the photogenic canals and bridges as well as the famous Masked Carnival, which claims to be the Worlds largest and most famous masked party, it arose in the middle ages but flourished in the 18th century and nowadays people fly from all over the World to take part in this grand spectacle.

I arrived in the city at night and was instantly taken with how the reflections in the water, lit up by the golden light of the street lights made some of the buildings distorted and exaggerated, whilst others in still water looked identical to the real thing and if you got the angle right, you could take a mirror image photograph, where you can hold the picture either way up and find it difficult to tell which is the real building and which is the reflection, these are always fun to take.

The next day I could not wait to get out and explore the area and was not disappointed at all, the whole place was a visual feast and a photographers dream, I took hundreds of pictures at every turn it seemed and eventually came to the conclusion that I must slow down and enjoy the views with the naked eye rather than looking through the lens of the camera all the time, yet within minutes once again I could not help myself and continued snapping the shutter at everything in sight, the beauty of the narrow streets of water just has to be captured.

I then decided to go and look for a suitable mask and costume to wear to the Carnival, meal and Masked Ball for the evening, it was so exciting wandering into each shop and trying on different masks, there are very obvious differences between the male and female masks, the female mask is alot softer and usually can be quite flattering, the male masks were very characterised, some with long pointed noses to show off their masculinity, the classic black mask with long nose is actually quite intimidating, these were very popular and are seen everywhere, very iconic of the male Venetian mask.